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Analysis of Complex Internal Flow Fields and the Development of Innovative Design and Imaging Measurement Technology

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Internal flow of gas turbine


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Transonic internal flow


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Aerodynamic noise and
unstable flow phenomena


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Improvement of
wind-lens wind turbine


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Application of imaging measurement
techniques using pressure sensitive
paints in low-speed flow fields


ABSTRACT:
One of the main research topics of the Fluids Engineering Science Laboratory is the analysis of complex internal flow fields related to turbomachinery, including vortex structures such as the tip leakage vortex, flow separation, aerodynamic noise, and inception of rotating stalls, using large-scale numerical simulations of turbulent flows. The laboratory also works to develop three-dimensional aerodynamic designs for rotating blades of turbomachines, and novel imaging measurement techniques using molecular sensors for EFD analysis.

DETAILED:
Detailed analysis of three-dimensional internal flows of turbomachines is vitally needed to avoid unstable phenomena such as rotating stalls in the development of high-performance and high-load turbomachines. Staff and students at the Fluids Engineering Science Laboratory work on analyses of complex internal flow fields related to turbomachinery via large-scale numerical simulations of turbulent flows and experiments using optical imaging measurement tools based on molecular sensors, as well as on the development of innovative design techniques for turbomachine blades using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).

Analysis using large-scale non-stationary numerical simulations and experiments are conducted to clarify unstable flow phenomena, such as rotating stalls in axial compressors and tip leakage vortex breakdowns in transonic centrifugal compressors, as well as the mechanisms of aerodynamic noise generation in turbomachines for industrial or home use. Novel methods of data assimilation between numerical simulations and experiments are also being developed. In addition, innovative design techniques for turbomachine blades using CFD are applied to the design of rotor cascades for low-noise fans and wind-lens wind turbines.

Pressure sensitive paint (PSP), using a novel optical imaging measurement technique of oxygen pressure based on molecular sensors, is being developed and applied to the measurement and visualization of pressure distributions on solid surfaces such as rotor blades, for which installation of conventional sensor probes is difficult. PSP is applied to solid surfaces inside turbomachines with relatively low speeds, such as on rotor blades, to visualize flow separations from the rotor blades and to analyze unstable phenomena such as rotating stall.

Fluids Engineering Science Laboratory,
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University
Professor Masato Furukawa
Associate Professor Hideo Mori
Assistant Professor Kazutoyo Yamada
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