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Studies3

FFAG Accelerator - A New Type of Accelerator

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150 MeV FFAG accelerator at
Kyushu University


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Arrangement of the 150 MeV FFAG
accelerator at the Center for
Accelerator and Beam
Applied Science, Kyushu University

ABSTRACT:
We are pursuing the development of the Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator, an advanced new type of accelerator recently installed at the Center for Accelerator and Beam Applied Sciences at Ito Campus of Kyushu University. This new accelerator, called the 150 MeV FFAG, provides a proton beam of energy of up to 150 MeV (roughly corresponding to half the speed of light) with a high repetition rate. New experimental plans based on the unique features of the 150 MeV FFAG accelerator have been proposed.

DETAILED:
Particle accelerators have provided powerful tools to advance the frontiers of science in various fields, including elementary particle, nuclear, life and material sciences. Further, they play an important role in applications in the fields of medicine, archeology, and elsewhere. There are fewer than 20 accelerators available to accelerate protons of greater than 100 MeV in Japan, and about half of them are for cancer therapy. Most of them are synchrotrons, but some are cyclotrons and linear accelerators.

A Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator is an advanced new type of accelerator that combines the features of the synchrotron and the cyclotron. The principle of FFAG acceleration was first proposed by Ohkawa. Following this, Mori (Professor at Kyoto Univ.) and his collaborators at KEK and Kyushu University demonstrated the successful extraction of a 100 MeV proton beam from the prototype FFAG machine, the first time this had ever been done anywhere. Thus, the FFAG is an accelerator born and bred in Japan. This prototype accelerator, called the 150 MeV FFAG, is now located on Ito Campus at Kyushu University.

The FFAG accelerator has the potential for various acceleration techniques, such as the simultaneous acceleration of multi-particles, a feat impossible on other types of accelerators. We are seeking the development of new accelerator technologies with the aim of exploring new frontiers in science.

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Particle accelerators able to provide a proton beam
with energy of greater than 90 MeV in Japan.
The facilities with the cream-colored background are for research,
and those with green backgrounds are for cancer therapy.


Applied Nuclear Physics,
Department of Applied Quantum Physics and Nuclear Engineering
Professor Nobuo Ikeda
Associate Professor Yusuke Uozumi
Assistant Professor Yujiro Yonemura
Assistant Professor Genichiro Wakabayashi
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