Aeronautics and Astronautics Course

Undergraduate

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Aeronautics and Astronautics Course

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Aircraft including passenger jets fly through the atmosphere, spacecraft including satellites and planetary exploration modules fly through space, and rockets and space planes fly through both the atmosphere and space. All of these craft are man-made, capable of movement in three dimensions and are developed based on common principles of science and technology. Japan has its own aerospace industry, including the development of the Japan-made MRJ passenger jet and the H-IIB rocket. The construction of the Japanese Experiment Module (nickname: Kibo (hope)) and the experiment using the small near-earth asteroid exploration module Hayabusa are both still fresh in our memories.

Aerospace engineering is an academic field focusing on specific things like aircraft and spacecraft mentioned above. It is characterized by the way all technologies and knowledge from every field of engineering are synthesized to rationally and logically create something in a lightweight form that is capable of flight. In particular, the chief character of the Aerospace Engineering Course is its prioritization of training in the laws of engineering through application of mathematics and dynamics. The university also maintains one of the leading experimental facilities in the country in order to support education and research covered by the course.

Since ages past it has been mankind's dream to fly. Since the dawn of flight we have now moved into a new century and the new dream for humanity is to travel into space and to the stars. By studying on the Aerospace Engineering Course we believe that students can contribute to the pursuit of that dream.

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The International Space Station (ISS),
where Dr. Koichi Wakata
(alumni of the Aerospace Engineering Course)
spent an extended stay.
Source: JAXA

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Noise-reduction wind tunnel used on the course
(Two measurement locations at 2m and 3.5m,
under a maximum wind speed of 60m/s)

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